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Saturday, February 7

  1. page Home edited ... (Frank Newbould, World War 2 civilian-effort poster) 1 Turning 'space' into 'place' ... th…
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    (Frank Newbould, World War 2 civilian-effort poster)
    1 Turning 'space' into 'place'
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    the time of"of writing the
    With respect to how the act of looking contributed to the construction of place, three enduring tropes have to be considered. The earliest is the Picturesque comparison of nature to art through repeated idealisation of scenery; it was subsequently joined (though not replaced) by the Romantic quest for 'authenticity' and 'exclusivity' of experience. These two seemingly opposed forms of seeing were both largely informed through a third phenomenon, the performative act of walking as an aesthetic or recreational pastime, a seemingly informal pursuit that has generated innumerable local representations and guidebooks over the past two and a half centuries. Much has been written on all of the above subjects, but less consideration has been given to them collectively from the primary perspective of a local history of looking, or an accumulation of individual explorations of the literary; realm. Furthermore, despite the long history of books on Lake District walks, only recently has walking begun to be recognised as an academic research methodology that has transformed space into place."
    see:Mark Hayward
    (view changes)
    1:14 am

Thursday, January 15

  1. page Outstanding natural beauty edited ... are not bound to offer public recreational opportunities as part of their designation A conce…
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    are not bound to offer public recreational opportunities as part of their designation
    A conceptual mind map for managing natural beauty
    {visuality.jpg}
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    2:11 am
  2. file visuality.jpg uploaded
    2:10 am
  3. page Outstanding natural beauty edited ... are mostly located in lowland areas. are not bound to offer public recreational opportunities…
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    are mostly located in lowland areas.
    are not bound to offer public recreational opportunities as part of their designation
    A conceptual mind map for managing natural beauty
    (view changes)

Tuesday, January 13

  1. page Pembrokshire Management Policies edited ... http://www.pembrokeshirecoast.org.uk/Files/files/Conservation/Conservation%20publications/Nati…
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    http://www.pembrokeshirecoast.org.uk/Files/files/Conservation/Conservation%20publications/National%20Park%20Management%20Plan%202009-2013-eng.pdf
    Landscape
    __L1:L1: Maintain landscape quality and function__
    __L2:
    function
    L2:
    Maintain seascape quality and function__
    __L3:
    function
    L3:
    Respect environmental capacity__
    __L4:
    capacity
    L4:
    Protect dark skies__
    __L5:
    skies
    L5:
    Limit noise pollution__pollution
    Biodiversity
    __B1:B1: Promote an
    ...
    to land management__
    __B2:
    management
    B2:
    Limit the
    ...
    change on biodiversity__
    __B3:
    biodiversity
    B3:
    Promote regional
    ...
    local conservation-grade food__
    __production
    food production and consumption__
    __B4:

    B4:
    Promote an
    ...
    to marine management__
    __B5:
    management
    B5:
    Support sustainable fisheries policy__
    __B6:
    policy
    B6:
    Limit the
    ...
    development on wildlife__wildlife
    Archaeology
    __AR1:AR1: Strengthen the
    ...
    for the archaeological__
    __resource__
    __AR2:
    archaeological resource
    AR2:
    Encourage proactive
    ...
    of archaeological sites__
    __AR3:
    sites
    AR3:
    Raise awareness
    ...
    the archaeological resource__
    __AR4:
    resource
    AR4:
    Manage the
    ...
    on the archaeological__
    __resource__
    __AR5:
    archaeological resource
    AR5:
    Mitigate the
    ...
    processes on the__
    __archaeological resource__
    the archaeological resource
    History
    __H1:H1: Strengthen the
    ...
    planning and management__
    __context
    management context of the historic environment__
    __H2:
    environment
    H2:
    Raise awareness
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    historic built environment__
    __H3:
    environment
    H3:
    Assist with
    ...
    of historic buildings__
    __H4:
    buildings
    H4:
    Manage the
    ...
    the historic built__
    __environment__
    built environment
    Geology
    G1: Manage the impacts of development on geodiversity
    (view changes)
    12:39 pm
  2. page Home edited ... (Frank Newbould, World War 2 civilian-effort poster) 1 Turning 'space' into 'place' ... to…
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    (Frank Newbould, World War 2 civilian-effort poster)
    1 Turning 'space' into 'place'
    ...
    to be 'beautv"'beauty" in turn
    With respect to how the act of looking contributed to the construction of place, three enduring tropes have to be considered. The earliest is the Picturesque comparison of nature to art through repeated idealisation of scenery; it was subsequently joined (though not replaced) by the Romantic quest for 'authenticity' and 'exclusivity' of experience. These two seemingly opposed forms of seeing were both largely informed through a third phenomenon, the performative act of walking as an aesthetic or recreational pastime, a seemingly informal pursuit that has generated innumerable local representations and guidebooks over the past two and a half centuries. Much has been written on all of the above subjects, but less consideration has been given to them collectively from the primary perspective of a local history of looking, or an accumulation of individual explorations of the literary; realm. Furthermore, despite the long history of books on Lake District walks, only recently has walking begun to be recognised as an academic research methodology that has transformed space into place."
    see:Mark Hayward
    ...
    1998-9
    Countryside Commission, Protecting Our Finest Countryside: Advice to Government, CCP 532, 1998, pp. 24-26.
    ...
    and that "[t]hey, "they should be
    ...
    the Government toto;
    "confirm that the landscape qualities of National Parks and AONBs are equivalent and that equivalent policies for their protection against inappropriate development are in place" and in particular, that they should legislate to "create an explicit statutory obligation on all public bodies ... to have regard to the need to enhance the natural beauty of AONBs"
    Countryside Council for Wales gave similar advice to the Welsh Office on Protected Landscapes in Wales
    ...
    2000
    Countryside and Rights of Way (CRoW) Act 2000
    ...
    of the CroWCRoW Act. The
    The new legislation in the CRoW Act marks a significant raising of the AONB status and confirms their importance in government policy...
    The CRoW Act reaffirms the purposes of AONB designation and confirms the powers of local authorities to take appropriate action to conserve or enhance the natural beauty of AONBs. It also places a new statutory duty on local authorities to prepare and publish a Management Plan for the AONB which sets out their policies for managing the AONB and for carrying out their functions in relation to it. New Plans must be prepared by April 2004 and then reviewed every five years.
    ...
    always engaged [with]with before.
    The Act also allows for the Secretary of State to establish, after consultation with local authorities, new management arrangements for AONBs in the form of a 'conservation board'. Conservation boards will not be appropriate for all AONBs but may be needed for the larger, more administratively complex AONBs where there is a range of issues which can best be addressed by an independent body with its own executive powers to act directly. Where these independent bodies have been established, they will carry out the duty to prepare Management Plans and will act to manage the AONB.
    On the issue of planning controls, the document states that:
    ...
    SPICe Briefing 05/08 Protected Areas, February 2005, p. 5
    a range of other environmental benefits that protected areas provide and some of those identified by Scottish Natural Heritage:
    ...
    providing places to enjoyfor enjoyment and recreate in.recreation.
    Finally, they can be practical examples of sustainable development. Some protected areas are able to pioneer initiatives and develop new, integrated, approaches to sustainable development. For example, the larger areas ... have wide aims, and an integrated focus. However, smaller protected areas can also play a role by developing new thinking and techniques on conservation management, responsible access, public participation, sustainable rural development and community well-being.
    2006
    ...
    Discussion of the merging of National Parks and AONBs
    2007
    Natural England (personal(personal)
    ...have stated
    ...
    best practice" :
    and that they "demonstrate the inextricable links between biodiversity and landscape quality" (Natural England, personal communication).
    ...
    and AONBs" howeverhowever, "common condition
    2007
    The Countryside Quality Counts (CQC) project
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    of landscape quality.quality, was initiated
    The report concluded that "at present the CQC results can only be used in an indicative way for those PLAs that either make up a large part of an individual JCA, or which are composed of several JCAs ... the CQC study shows how a national framework for monitoring change within the PLA's could be developed. This might be of relevance if, for example, a Public Service Agreement were to be developed around the idea of ensuring that the landscape quality of these areas was being sustained" (p. 31). The report recommended that action should be taken to initiate such an assessment for PLAs. The headline results for the study showed that of England's 159 Joint Character Areas:
    10% have been enhanced
    ...
    It is at this level that the simple act of looking gives rise lo aesthetic experiences, and here that people interact with ecosystems in a very general way. Some landscape interactions elicit aesthetic experiences that have traditionally been called "scenic beauty." while others elicit different aesthetic experiences, such as, 'attachment', 'identity' and the 'need for protection'. The PER, is important because it is the scale at which humans intentionally change landscapes by inventing management systems to produce goods and services from natural resources. Aesthetic experiences may thus lead people to change the landscape in ways that may or may not be consistent with its ecological function.
    Nevertheless, aesthetic experiences also evoke through the PER a powerful urge to regularly engage with a landscape's component ecosystems on smaller scales. Environmental phenomena extend from the sub-microscopic to the global and change over time-spans ranging from milliseconds to millennia. In landscape ecology ecosystems can be as small as the home range of a mollusc burrowing in a sandy shore to an avian habitat that is larger than a continent. It is difficult for us to understand, care about, and act purposefully upon phenomena that occur at scales beyond our own direct experience, but the establishment of a relationship between aesthetics and ecology can provide an easier route. This implies that landscapes that are perceived as aesthetically pleasing, at any level, are more likely to be appreciated and protected than are landscapes perceived as undistinguished or ugly, regardless of their less directly perceivable ecological importance. .
    ...
    cross curricular framework..framework.
    {shells-wallpaper.jpg}
    The arts and sciences are essential ways that we come to know the world, but much of our response to the environment is determined through individual experience of landscapes. Because humans so powerfully affect environmental phenomena, it is highly meaningful and relevant to understand human interaction with ecosystems at the scale of landscapes which are essentially humanity's ecological footprints.
    ...
    • The ecological model, an objectivist approach, defines landscape quality as independent of the observer and entirely determined by ecological or biological features in the landscape. Within this model the observer is seen as a user of the landscape and a potential disturbance.
    • The formal aesthetic model, also an objectivist approach, characterises landscapes in terms of formal properties, such as form, line, unity and variety. These properties are seen as inherent characteristics of the landscape that can be assessed by appropriately trained individuals (e.g. landscape architects).
    ...
    between measured
    physical
    physical characteristics of
    • The psychological model, a subjectivist approach, characterises the landscape in subjective terms by relying on human judgements of complexity, mystery, legibility, etc.These judgements are then related to an array of cognitive, affective and evaluative dimensions of landscape experiences.
    * The phenomenological model is the most subjectivist model. It focuses on how each individual assigns personal relevance to landscape attributes in personal interpretations of landscape encounters.
    (view changes)
    12:17 pm
  3. page Home edited ... (Frank Newbould, World War 2 civilian-effort poster) 1 Turning 'space' into 'place' ... th…
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    (Frank Newbould, World War 2 civilian-effort poster)
    1 Turning 'space' into 'place'
    ...
    these deposits arcare the early
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    from the primarvprimary perspective of
    see:Mark Hayward
    https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=zszCAwAAQBAJ&pg=PA24&lpg=PA24&dq=visual+studies+natural+beauty&source=bl&ots=gntsTNbwIY&sig=Pvfugsn1K5dKDQPqNbxQbZ-JVBU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=xQ6MVPfjDorwUtDTgRA&ved=0CCkQ6AEwATgU#v=onepage&q=visual%20studies%20natural%20beauty&f=false
    (view changes)
    12:08 pm

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